Groundwater Use in Urban Development

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Cities, Development, Engineering, Science and Technology, Systems Engineering, Urban Ecology, Water, Water Resources Engineering

Groundwater is an important water source in urbanized areas.  Cities across many geographies and climates, including Beijing, Mexico City, Buenos Aires, Los Angeles, Bangkok, Houston, Tokyo, Perth, and Lima, have all utilized groundwater to supply much of their potable water needs at some stage of development (Howard and Gelo 2002).  Groundwater provides a significant portion […]

Treating Water in the Home

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Engineering, Infrastructure, Public Policy, Science and Technology, Uncategorized, Water

Treating water in a home or a building may be relevant in a few situations.  First, in communities without sufficient capital to build water treatment facilities, residents are forced to drink bottled water.  This happens thorughout the world, from the farmlands of East Africa to the rural communities of California.  Second, many in the sustainability […]

Urban Water and Governance

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Cities, Development, Engineering, Environment, Infrastructure, Public Policy, Science and Technology, Systems Engineering, Urban Ecology, Water, Water Resources Engineering

Water infrastructure is typically about pipes and bills.  Most cities have dedicated departments that manage water distribution, sewage, and stormwater systems.  Today, however, new designs for more sustainable urban development are re-considering how we deliver these services for residents.  Rather than provide and manage water through centralized services, what are the opportunities and challenges associated […]

Understanding Arsenic in Drinking Water

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Engineering, Environment, Infrastructure, Public Policy, Science and Technology, Water, Water Resources Engineering

Arsenic is a naturally-occurring element that can leach into groundwater and surface water from rocks and minerals.  In most areas, natural levels of arsenic in water are less than 1 ppb, though some communities, particularly in the Western U.S., have recorded natural arsenic levels in water sources over 10 ppb1.  Arsenic can have both acute […]

Enlightening Facts for UV & Water Treatment

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Engineering, Infrastructure, Uncategorized, Water

Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection uses electromagnetic radiation to kill microorganisms such as protozoans, bacteria, and viruses damaging their genetic material (DNA and RNA).  While UV radiation applications for treatment are a century old, date to, improved cost-effectiveness and concerns over conventional disinfection methods have increased the popularity of UV disinfection in recent decades.  In the U.S., […]

Point-of-Use Water Treatments

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Engineering, Infectious Disease, Infrastructure, Water, Water Resources Engineering

The cover image for this post comes from FreshHome.com and is just fantastic and quite fitting for a blog post on Point-of-Use treatment, so I had to use it and give all the attribution in the world possible. A variety of physical and chemical point-of-use (POU) treatments exist1.  The most prevalent treatment approach in homes […]

Future Water Use: Solutions in Technology?

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in California, Environment, Science and Technology, Systems Engineering, Uncategorized, Water Resources Engineering

As a society, we often seek solutions to social problems in technology and innovation. If we need more food or water, we will develop more productive processes that exploit available resources. Technology and innovation are at the heart of fundamental conceptions prosperity, as crystallized by Endogenous Growth Theory that dominates economic thought. This innovation almost […]

Big Dreams and Bountiful Capital: Western U.S. Expansion

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in California, Engineering, Environment, History, Systems Engineering, Water Resources Engineering

The settlement of the American West in the mid-nineteenth century saw streams of Americans, Europeans, Asians, and Central and South Americans converge on the region and its resources. The new peoples brought their views of agriculture, exploitation, and wealth to the strange ecosystems of the West. For East Coast Americans and Europeans, who were accustomed […]

Infrastructure and CA Water Policy Program

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in California, Systems Engineering, Water Resources Engineering

Last Wednesday, I attended a program entitled Water Conflicts and Resolution: Economy vs. Environment, at Resources for the Future in D.C. The program was part of the unveiling of a new book, Managing California’s Water: From Conflict to Reconciliation, from researchers at the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC), UC Davis, and UC Riverside. The […]